June Workshops 2019

Registration now open!

CHD is an approved provider of continuing education in New York State for these licenses:

LCSW, LMSW, LP, LCAT, LMFT and LMHC

Workshops may also be taken via telephone or self-study.

For more information, please email us at info@chdny.org or call us at 212-642-6303.

Monday

W105-19. Treating addiction: A modern psychoanalytic approach

For the modern analyst, as for Shakespeares Antonio, whats past is prologue: The events of our lives have brought us to this point in time and circumstance; we cannot simply deal with the current problem without first gaining some grasp on the events of the past. Helping our patients describe their formative experiences – the choices they made in their childhood and those that were made for them – is the starting point for clarifying the role of addictive behavior in their current life. Why? Because a deliberative, respectful, investigative discussion of the environment in which substance misuse took root can ignite the process of diluting the harsh self-recrimination that is the hallmark of so many people who suffer with addictive disorders.

Instructor: Harlan Matusow, PhD, LP

Day/Time: June 10, 12:30-2pm

Location: 928 Broadway (bet. 21st & 22nd Streets), Suite 804, NYC 914-320-0350

Fee: $45

CE Hours: 1.5

Telephone: No

Self-Study: No

Tuesday

W106-19. Adolescents: We love them and hate living with them at the same time

Participants are encouraged to tell stories of living with their adolescents and seek ways to prevent murder and mayhem and develop ways of cooperating with each other and meeting everybody’s needs.  Yes, it is possible, not easy, but possible.

Instructor: Michaela Kane Schaeffer, PhD, LP

Day/Time: Alternating Tuesdays, June 11 & 25, 5:30-7pm

Location: 170 Rugby Road, Brooklyn (Q train, Beverly Road station) 718-693-2243

Fee: $80

CE Hours: 3

Telephone: Yes

Self-Study: No

W102-19. Couples: The art of staying together for the long run in spite of many obstacles

Past history, money, and sex issues, etc.  Participants are encouraged to present actual life situations and problems and work on finding solutions.  The benefits and obstacles of honesty and letting it all hang out will be discussed.

Instructor: Michaela Kane Schaeffer, PhD, LP

Day/Time: Alternating Tuesdays, June 4 & 18, 5:30-7pm

Location: 170 Rugby Road, Brooklyn (Q train, Beverly Road station) 718-693-2243

Fee: $80

CE Hours: 3

Telephone: Yes

Self-Study: No

Wednesday

W101-19. Intergenerational/Transgenerational Trauma

“We may safely assume that no generation is able to conceal any of its more important mental processes from its successors” Sigmund Freud Totem and Taboo (1913)   This course focuses on intergenerational/transgenerational trauma, its definition and concepts, its history in psychoanalytic practice, and its influence on trauma survivors, their families, and a range of mental health professionals. This is an experience explored in and out of analysis. The transmission of trauma involves the body, the emotions, human development – biological and psychobiological factors in close interaction over time. Do we inherit a memory of our ancestors’ traumas and how. (Kandel ; Solms) We will be reviewing neuro-psychoanalysis and examining the brain and looking at Freudian theory, depth psychology, language and utilizing ‘the narrative’ as a method for a better and deeper understanding. Students, analysands and patients bring in a story and what presented. What is the meaning of the story? The therapist collects memories, assists the patient in recalling and communicating the unsayable. What is the wound and where does it come from, how did it originate?

Instructor: Natalie Riccio, PhD, LCSW, LP, NCPsyA

Day/Time: Alternating Wednesdays, May 22, June 5 & 19, 2-4pm

Location: 235 West 76th Street, Suite 4-D NYC (212)724-4539

Fee: $150

CE Hours: 6

Telephone: No

Self-Study: No

Thursday

W103-19. Understanding and Coping with Trauma

In this course, students explore the therapist’s awareness of indicators of post-traumatic stress and examine theoretical overviews and treatment perspectives. Case examples of patients displaying a range of traumatic sequelae are presented in order to identify elements of psychic and physical trauma, the aftermath of trauma (PTSD), and various treatment approaches.

Instructor: Susan R. Blumenson, PhD, LP, NCPsyA

Day/Time: Alternating Thursdays, June 6 & 13, 4-5:30pm

Location: 24 Fifth Ave., @ 9th St., Ground Floor Suite, NYC (212) 473-5580

Fee: $80

CE Hours: 3

Telephone: Yes

Self-Study: No

Friday

W107-19. The Plausible Hypothesis: a technique to help people in therapy say everything

     One of the most important distinctions between Modern Psychoanalysis and most other approaches to psychoanalysis is the emphasis on whose verbal contribution is more important to help people change — the therapist or the person in therapy.  Most of the other schools of thought emphasize what the analyst says: what and how to interpret and the importance of giving the analysand insight.  The Modern idea is, to help people change, the person in therapy has to say everything, and with the analyst’s role limited to helping the person who has come to him or her for help to say everything.  When I was in training, the most important tool we were taught to help people say everything was the use of joining techniques — what my colleague Jacob Kirman calls agreeing with the patient. And it’s a very good tool.
     But, after many years of experience, I’ve developed a whole repertory of additional techniques that I find help the people I work with talk about an ever-expanding range of things.  One of these techniques is to tell a story that suggests a new way of looking at the person’s problem — what I call the plausible hypothesis.  A plausible hypothesis can look like an interpretation, but the idea is not for the analyst to reveal a Truth to the person-in-analysis so much as to give the person seeking help an expanded vocabulary, a new metaphor, or a different way of looking at the story he or she has been telling so as to have new tools to tell the story in ever greater depth.  I never present a plausible hypothesis as anything other than something that might or might not be true or as an insight that in itself would be curative.
     Sometimes the plausible hypothesis takes the form of a story taken from classical Greek myths, like Freud’s fondness for Oedipus, but it can be anything else, often suggested by the patient’s own frame of reference and sometimes drawn from my own storehouse of knowledge, and can include song lyrics, allusions to popular culture, jokes, historical events, and so forth.  
In this workshop, I will work with the participants to help them find plausible hypotheses that might help the people in therapy with them find a story that will give them new tools to say things that they might not have been able to say without the new hypothesis. 
Limited to four participants.

Instructor: Richard Friedman, PhD, NCPsyA Member of The American Society of Clinical Hypnosis

Day/Time: June 21, 12:30-2pm

Location: 1123 Park Ave, #1D, NYC 212-289-3592

Fee: $45

CE Hours: 1.5

Telephone: No

Self-Study: No

W104-19. Catching Up on Race Talk

Like psychoanalysis, race relations has a language of its own. What is diversity? intersectionality? critical race theory? Who is oppressed? Who is privileged? Come learn the terms and explore social / political and emotional reasons for the uptick in race issues in the news and in our lives. David L. Eng and Shinhee Han’s book Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation will provide a theoretical groundwork for the integration of race ideas with psychoanalytic thought. 

Instructor: Calla C. Jo, LP, LCSW

Day/Time: Alternating Fridays, June 7 & June 21, 6pm to 7.30pm

Location: 24 Fifth Avenue at 9th Street, Ground Floor Suite, NYC 917-428-7347

Fee: $80

CE Hours: 3

Telephone: No

Self-Study: No

Additional Learning Options for CE Credits

Each class indicates which options are available.

Class via Telephone

Please contact the instructor for call-in information.

Self-Study

Requirements for self-study credit to be discussed with instructor.
Please contact the instructor to receive readings.

As of January, 2015, CE hours are required to maintain LCSW and LMSW licenses.
As of January, 2017, CE hours are required to maintain LP license.

CHD Admissions Policy: CHD admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights and privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, sexual orientation, age, disability, and national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship, and other school–administered programs.