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Center for Human Development — NYS Licensure-Qualifying Institute

Center for Human Development Bulletin: 2014–2020, Vol. VIII

The Psychoanalytic Program Registered by the New York State Education Department Chartered by the Board of Regents and The University of the State of New York Member InstituteThe Center for Human Development (CHD) admits all students without regard for age, ethnic background, nationality, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or disability.

Board & Administration

Board of Trustees

John Augliera, LP, MA, Member-at-Large
Susan R. Blumenson, PhD, LP, Founding Member, Secretary
Susan Jakubowicz, PhD, LP, LCSW, CPG, Founding Executive Director
Allan Jay, BS, Chair
Michaela Kane Schaeffer, PhD, LP, Member-at-Large
Jacqueline Swensen, PhD, LP, LCSW, Member-at-Large

Administration

Joan Antelman, LCSW, Registrar, Administrator
John Augliera, LP, MA, Associate Director, Alumni & Faculty Liaison, Student Advisor Coordinator
Susan R. Blumenson, PhD, LP, Dean of Curriculum
Susan Jakubowicz, PhD, LP, LCSW, CPG, Founding Executive Director
Michaela Kane Schaefer, PhD, LP, Research Coordinator
Jacqueline Swensen, PhD, LP, LCSW, Dean of Clinical Training

Consultants

Eli Greenberg, MD, Psychiatric Consultant
Susan Jakubowicz, PhD, LP, LCSW, CPG, Group Program Consultant

Faculty Members

John Augliera, LP, MA
Susan R. Blumenson, PhD, LP
Susan Jakubowicz, PhD, LP, LCSW, CPG
Calla C Jo, LP, LCSW
Harlan Matusow, PhD, LP
Michaela Kane Shaeffer, PhD, LP
Jacqueline Swensen, PhD, LP, LCSW

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Introduction

Founded in 2001 by Susan Jakubowicz and other cofounders, CHD is a psychoanalytic institute with a learning environment designed for students. We combine theoretical with experiential learning. Our high academic standards satisfy New York State requirements. Our program is based on the groundbreaking work of Hyman Spotnitz, MD, the founder of Modern Psychoanalysis, who developed theories and techniques for working with severely regressed individuals, as well as emotional communication. CHD prepares its students to become licensed psychoanalysts. We offer continuing education for licensed social workers, and other mental health professionals. We’re dedicated to developing well-trained and compassionate professionals. We also welcome those interested in personal growth and development.

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Mission Statement

The mission of the Center for Human Development is to provide intensive clinical training and academic expertise in Modern Psychoanalysis and other schools of thought. The institute offers courses in the history, theory, and technique of psychoanalysis, case supervision and research. The educational experience derives from both emotional and intellectual learning.

We introduce mental healthcare professionals, including social workers, counselors, psychotherapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists, to Modern Psychoanalytic techniques, offering a lively forum for the exchange of ideas. To maintain high professional standards and ethics in the practice of psychoanalysis, in compliance with several external accrediting bodies, we award certificates in psychoanalysis to qualified graduates.

Not only does CHD foster research on new understandings of human growth and development, we arranged for its publication in our journal Current Trends in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. Here, we published articles from all psychotherapeutic disciplines. We presented the unique ways these respective disciplines have developed of helping patients/clients, so that we may learn more about the therapeutic process. We value what spiritual, community, financial, and government leaders, as well as educators, have to contribute to our field’s base of knowledge. We plan on another edition of our inaugural journal in the future.

Our beneficial community outreach program includes a CHD Outpatient Treatment and Referral Service in Manhattan, which complies with city and state regulations. It offers low-fee, short- and long-term psychotherapy to the community, with advanced CHD candidates, working under close faculty supervision, staffing the Service. We sponsor lectures, conferences, special events, and June workshops on a variety of mental health topics of interest to the community, such as new advances in neuropsychology and genetic research, substance abuse, conflict resolution, parenting, romantic and family relationships, vocational decision-making, and career advancement.

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What is Modern Psychoanalysis?

Modern Psychoanalysis emerged from the clinical research of Hyman Spotnitz, as a logical extension of Sigmund Freud’s approach. Freud contended that successful psychoanalytic treatment required a transference relationship developing between patient and therapist. Freud also believed that those who suffer from severe narcissistic disorders, such as schizophrenics, could not be helped by analysis because they were unable to develop a transference relationship or respond to interpretation. However, Spotnitz developed different techniques for treating even severely ill schizophrenic patients. These interventions helped patients develop a narcissistic transference that would lead to the formation of an object transference. Those special techniques became the basis of Modern Psychoanalysis.

Modern Psychoanalysts employ nonthreatening, ego-strengthening techniques that facilitate the narcissistic patient’s capacity to verbalize her/his thoughts and feelings. We maintain appropriate levels of stimulation (or frustration), respond to the patient’s contact function (when the patient asks the analyst a question) as a guide to intervene. Spotnitz developed numerous interventions, including object-oriented questions, joining and mirroring.

Another cornerstone of Modern Psychoanalysis is working with induced feelings (transference) from the patient. The psychoanalyst’s feelings (countertransference) toward the patient involves detecting subtle changes in a patient by analyzing their own reactions and feelings.

Modern Psychoanalysts also use emotional communications to strengthen patients’ egos and to avoid narcissistic injury. We allow patients to attribute strong, “dangerous” thoughts to the analyst, so those thoughts can be verbalized and explored. This helps patients mature from a narcissistic to a more objective state, even in cases involving dysfunction stemming from preverbal stages, or the most seriously afflicted, primitive psyches.

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General Information for New Students

CHD Locations

Executive Office
Susan Jakubowicz, Founding Executive Director
301 East 21st Street, Suite 1-K
New York, NY  10010

In addition to the Executive Office which has a large classroom, classes meet in our instructors’ offices throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. Most offices are handicap-accessible, as is the main Executive Office. We make accommodations for the special needs of our students.

Administrative & Registrar Office
Joan Antelman, Registrar, Administrator
515 East 14th Street, 8-H
New York, NY  10009

Phone: 212-642-6303
Registrar Email: Joannyc@aol.com
General Email: info@chdny.org
Fax: 646-654-6779

You may also find information on our website: www.chdny.org

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Faculty

The faculty of the Center for Human Development includes licensed and certified psychoanalysts, who also hold advanced degrees in psychoanalysis, psychology, social work, education, the sciences, and/or the humanities. All faculty members are New York State licensed psychoanalysts, and all are registered by the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP). For a fuller description of credentials and publications, please consult the section entitled “Faculty Biographies.”

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Licensure-Qualifying Psychoanalytic Institute

CHD is registered by the New York State Education Department as a licensure-qualifying psychoanalytic training institute. This means that all students who graduate with a certificate in psychoanalysis from CHD are eligible to sit for the New York State licensing examination in psychoanalysis. The Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York granted CHD a charter in 2002. It is a member institute of the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis.

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Research Library

In its Executive and Director’s offices, CHD maintains a library of 3600 volumes for the use of its students and faculty. Books, journals, and reprints of articles from the fields of classical psychoanalysis, modern psychoanalysis, group therapy, couples therapy, family therapy, neuropsychology and complementary medicine, among others, form the library’s holdings. The library in the Administrative Office contains complete files of course readings and bibliographies. In addition, our central location in New York City gives students and faculty access to some of the best psychoanalytic libraries in the country; to the medical libraries at various teaching hospitals; and to the libraries of graduate and social work schools.

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Outpatient Treatment and Referral Service

CHD maintains an outpatient treatment and referral service in Manhattan, providing individual, couple, family, and group treatment at low cost to the community. The Treatment Service complies with all city and state regulations. Under the direction of CHD’s senior psychoanalysts, advanced candidates staff the Service and treat patients under close faculty supervision. All treatment conducted by candidates is monitored closely by CHD faculty in supervisory courses TSS201 and TSS202; in practice courses P201 and P202; and in individual and group supervision.

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Continuing Education Programs

CHD offers continuing education workshops that are open to students, professionals in the field, and the community. (For more information, see the section entitled “June Workshops.”) We offer several special projects, including clinical discussions and other presentations. Students may earn continuing education credits by attending our courses, June workshops, seminars, special projects, and conferences. Those interested in continuing education hours, such as social workers, psychoanalysts, psychologists, counselors, and educators, should contact the Administrative Offices. For general information about our continuing education programs, and/or to be added to our mailing list, please contact the Office of Administration.

The Center for Human Development is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work and for Psychoanalysis as an approved provider of continuing education for both licensed social workers (#0023), and licensed psychoanalysts (#P-0016). For more information, please contact the administrative office via phone (212-642-6303) or email (info@chdny.org).

Please consult your professional organization for CE requirements.

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Admissions Procedures

At licensure-qualifying training institutes such as CHD, New York State enforces the following student admission criterion: “To be admitted to the [institute] program, the program shall require the student to have completed a master’s or higher degree program in any field registered by the NYS Education Department. This [conforms to] Part 52 of the Regulations, Section 52.35(b).” Students applying to the CHD Psychoanalytic Program, therefore, must have completed both baccalaureate and master’s degrees from accredited colleges and universities in order to be admitted to CHD.

CHD admits all students without regard for age, ethnic background, nationality, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or disability.

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To Register

To register for courses at CHD, please telephone the Office of Administration at 212-642-6303, or email us at info@chdny.org to request an application. Alternatively, you may complete the application form at the end of this Bulletin and mail it to our Administrative Office. We accept applications and transcripts throughout the year, and students are admitted for either the Fall or Spring semesters.

After the Administrative Office receives your application form accompanied by a check for $65, as well as official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate work (MA- and PhD-level, if applicable), we will arrange an admission interview. Transcripts must be on file before you attend CHD classes.

Next, to become officially matriculated in the psychoanalytic program, send in the matriculation application, along with a $65 check. You can request the matriculation form by telephoning or emailing the CHD Administration Office, or you can use the matriculation form included at the end of this Bulletin.

In your admission and/or matriculation applications, you may request equivalency credit for coursework, training analysis, and supervision completed at other psychoanalytic institutes. Please submit transcripts of previous analytic work to the Administrative Office. The Admissions Committee will evaluate your transcripts according to New York State Education Department regulations. All transfer credits will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, but generally, a maximum of 12 credits is usually accepted. In order to receive a certificate from CHD, candidates must take classes at the institute for at least two years, including one year working with patients at the Treatment Service

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Information for Enrolled Students

Training Analysis Requirements—A General Description

A training analysis is a special form of psychoanalysis for students who wish to become psychoanalysts. Conducted by training analysts with wide clinical and academic experience, The training analysis is the cornerstone of all practice in the field; it educates students about their own psychological makeup and the workings of the unconscious.

We require that students seek a training analyst from the CHD faculty. To conduct treatment with minimal interruption by unconscious, personal, and/or sociocultural biases, all students in the psychoanalytic program are required to enter a training analysis with a New York State licensed psychoanalyst who is a NAAP registered training psychoanalyst and on the CHD faculty.

We require that students begin an individual training analysis by the second semester of attendance in the program. Before selecting their training analysts, students must gain the written approval of the Training Committee. Without written approval, analytic hours will not be counted in the number needed for graduation. After receiving approval, students privately establish both frequency and fee with their chosen analysts. Candidates must remain in training analysis throughout their tenure at CHD. They may request equivalency credit for previous modern and classical psychoanalyses during their admissions interviews; such requests will receive consideration by the CHD Admissions Committee and decided on a case-by-case basis.

In order to graduate from the institute as a psychoanalyst, a student must complete a total of 350 hours of Modern Psychoanalysis with a New York State licensed psychoanalyst who is also a NAAP registered modern psychoanalyst on the CHD faculty. Of this requirement, 50 hours may be satisfied in group analysis with a NYS licensed psychoanalyst who is also a NAAP registered modern analyst on the CHD faculty.

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Treatment Service Level

Supervision and Class Requirements at the Treatment Service Level
Students may begin Treatment Service after completing the following requirements:

Requirements for Application to the Treatment Service

Students are required to complete a minimum of six courses – two Maturation courses (preferably M101 and M102); three Clinical Studies courses (C101, C102 and C103); and a Theory course (T107). The student needs to have completed at least 50 hours of training analysis with a certified NAAP approved modern analyst as well as demonstrate readiness for this clinical program as determined through an interview process. When students are ready to begin Treatment Service they first meet with their Faculty Advisors and then fill out an Application for Placement form which is obtained from the CHD office. After the form is completed it is sent to the CHD office for review and an interview is set up with the student and a member of the Treatment Committee. After the interview, a decision regarding the student’s readiness is conveyed to the Training Committee.

Supervision at the Treatment Service Level teaches students about intrapsychic and interpersonal dynamics in the psychoanalytic setting. It focuses particularly on the elements of transference, unconscious fantasy, resistance, countertransference, and countertransference resistance, while also offering various ways of integrating theory and technique in conducting clinical treatment. Students learn how to formulate and implement a wide range of interventions

Treatment Service Requirements are as follows:

  1. Supervision and classes at the Treatment Service Level.
    Required: A minimum of two semesters of Treatment Service Supervision courses (TSS201 and TSS202), taken concurrently with P201 and P202. In these supervision classes, there is a special focus on resistances that appear early in psychoanalytic treatment. The hours accrued in these classes do not count toward the graduation requirement of 200 hours of supervision.
  2. Individual supervision of Treatment Service cases (privately arranged).
    Students present their Treatment Service cases in individual supervision to an approved CHD supervisor. At least three patients are seen at the Treatment Service and are presented in the required individual supervision. A minimum of 50 hours with at least one CHD-supervisors (someone other than the Control Supervisor) is required and in addition, a minimum of 150 hours with at least two CHD-approved supervisors is required to complete this phase.
  3. Control Supervision of a Treatment Service case (privately arranged).
    Prerequisite: approval by the Treatment Service Faculty. The student presents one Treatment Service case to a CHD-approved Control Supervisor at a frequency of one hour of supervision for every four hours of patient contact. In-depth study of the single case focuses on resolution of resistances in the treatment and complete understanding of the patient’s psychodynamics. A minimum of 50 hours with one supervisor is required.
  4. Treatment Service patients are seen at the CHD Treatment Service site or at a NYS approved and licensed facility with a signed contract with CHD approving the facility.
  5. A total of 750 approved patient contact hours must be accrued on the Treatment Service level while taking the two required Treatment Service courses.
  6. Students must remain in supervision for the Treatment Service cases until graduation.

To summarize the clinical requirements for graduation from the program in psychoanalysis: Complete at least 150 hours of supervision with New York State licensed and NAAP registered psychoanalysts on the faculty of CHD—50 hours of which must be in Control Analysis with a New York State licensed and NAAP-registered analytic supervisor on CHD’s faculty; and an additional 150 hours must be with a minimum of two (2) additional supervisors. No supervisor can be one’s analyst or one’s analyst a supervisor. Each student must have had a minimum of three supervisors at the Treatment Service level in order to graduate from CHD.

*To sit for the licensing exam in NYS for the L.P. credential, students need to refer to the following website to obtain information about the detailed requirement of 1500 hours of clinical experience go to: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mhp/psyanlforms.htm

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Selecting Analysts and/or Supervisors

Students who request that a faculty member become their analyst or supervisor while taking that faculty member’s course are advised that they need exposure to other faculty members before making that decision. In order to make an informed choice, they must wait until the middle of the next semester, when they have had experience with other instructors. At this point, students must send their written requests to the Training Committee for approval. Only with written approval from the Training Committee will analytic and supervisory hours count toward CHD graduation requirements. Candidates must remain in training analysis throughout their tenure at CHD. Those who are seeing patients also must remain in supervision throughout their tenure at CHD.

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Grading Policies

CHD employs a grading system of Pass, Incomplete, and No Credit. The minimum grade considered satisfactory in all courses is a Pass. In order to receive a passing grade for a class, students must attend the 12 class meetings and write 11 logs. They still may receive credit for the course, however, if they use the two optional absences. If a student misses more than the two allowable absences or fails to submit 11 logs, he/she will not be awarded credit for the course. Students may discuss with their course instructor any unusual circumstances that might have prevented satisfactory completion of a course. At the instructor’s discretion, a student may be offered a grade of Incomplete and told the conditions under which a Pass may be granted. All grades of Incomplete must be remedied before Week 6 of the following semester.

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Student Records

CHD keeps all confidential student records in locked file cabinets in Administrative Office. Each student file contains transcripts of the student’s baccalaureate and master’s degree work, a detailed transcript of the student’s CHD coursework, confirmation of the number of sessions completed in training analysis and supervision, and faculty evaluations. Students have the right to review their own files. To request a review students may contact the Office of Administration.

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Advisement

The Advisement Committee assigns to new students Faculty Advisors who will remain the students’ mentors throughout their training. The advisor guides the student through the program, answers questions about clinical and academic requirements, aids in planning the candidate’s training program(s), and helps with registration each semester. Students should feel free to contact their advisors at any time. To discover which advisor they have been assigned, students may telephone or email the Administrative Office.

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Leave of Absence

To request a leave of absence, students may write to the Training Committee of CHD explaining the reasons for the leave and the proposed semester(s). Students who are granted a Leave of Absence must pay the $50 fee for “Maintaining Matriculation” each semester they are on leave.

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Interruptions for Unsatisfactory Attendance, Grades and/or Progress

Because of a) unsatisfactory attendance (more than the two absences permitted in courses); b) failing grades in courses; c) unsatisfactory progress (obvious difficulty in mastering theoretical and/or clinical material); and d) behavior inappropriate to an analytic student (disruptive classroom behavior; inability to interact constructively with other students; and failure to keep to the educational and learning goals of the class), the Executive Directors and the Training Committee will recommend in writing that students interrupt their studies at the institute in order to work on the areas causing difficulty. They will make specific recommendations about the students’ training analysis, supervision, academic courses, and/or clinical work—suggestions designed to resolve obstacles to progress. They also will describe the conditions for readmission. The recommended period of interruption will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

When the period of interruption concludes, students may send a letter to the Executive Directors requesting readmission to CHD’s program and detailing the steps they have taken to remedy the original problem(s). The Executive Directors and the Training Committee will review this letter and send a decision in writing regarding the students’ re-enrollment in the Program.

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Grievance Procedures

CHD provides a set of procedures which students must follow in order to resolve grievances:

  1. Students first must discuss their grievance with the faculty member or administrator involved;
  2. If this proves unsatisfactory, students then must write to the Training Committee describing their grievance and attempts made to resolve it;
  3. The Training Committee relays this information to the Executive Directors, who respond in writing to the students;
  4. If students disagree with the Executive Directors’ decision, they may send a letter of appeal to the CHD Board of Trustees, who write a timely letter of response stating the final decision.

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CHD Students’ Committee

In Spring 2002, students enrolled in CHD’s first semester of classes volunteered to form a Students’ Committee. This committee meets regularly to address the needs of the student body; make suggestions to, or ask questions of, the institute administration; work on continuing education tasks and activities; and aid the institute in advertising its programs and events. A faculty representative functions as an advisor to the committee.

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Academic Calendar: Fall 2016 – Fall 2020

FALL 2017

  • Registration must be received by August 21. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Fall classes begin Monday, September 11, 2017.

Week 1: September 11–15
Week 2: September 18–22

Classes meet Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 18, 19 and 20
No classes Thursday and Friday, Sept. 21 and 22

Week 3: September 25–29
Week 4: October 2–6
Week 5: October 9–13
Week 6: October 16–20
Week 7: October 23–27
Week 8: October 30–November 3
Week 9: November 6–10
Week 10: November 13–17
Week 11: November 20–24

Classes meet Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 20 and 21
No classes Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 22, 23 and 24

Week 12: November 27–December 1

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday classes meet Dec. 6, 7 and 8

Thursday and Friday classes meet Dec. 14 and 15

SPRING 2018

  • Registration must be received by January 15. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Spring classes begin Monday, January 22, 2018.

Week 1: January 22–26
Week 2: January 29–February 2
Week 3: February 5–9
Week 4: February 12–16

No classes February 19–23

Week 5: February 26–March 2
Week 6: March 5–9
Week 7: March 12–16
Week 8: March 19–23
Week 9: March 26–30
Week 10: April 2–6
Week 11: April 9–13
Week 12: April 16–20

June Workshops begin Monday, June 4, 2018

FALL 2018

  • Registration must be received by August 20. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Fall classes begin Monday, September 10, 2018.

Week 1: September 10–14

No classes Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 10 and 11
Classes meet Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Sept. 12, 13 and 14

Week 2: September 17–21

No classes Wednesday, Sept. 19
Classes meet Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, Sept. 17, 18, 20 and 21

Week 3: September 24–28
Week 4: October 1–5
Week 5: October 8–12
Week 6: October 15–19
Week 7: October 22–26
Week 8: October 29–November 2
Week 9: November 5–9
Week 10: November 12–16
Week 11: November 19–23

Classes meet Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 19 and 20
No classes Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 21, 22 and 23

Week 12: November 26–November 30

Monday and Tuesday classes meet Dec. 3 and 4
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday classes meet Dec. 5, 6 and 7
Wednesday classes meet Dec. 12

SPRING 2019

  • Registration must be received by January 14. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Spring classes begin Monday, January 21, 2019.

Week 1: January 21–25
Week 2: January 28–February 1
Week 3: February 4–8
Week 4: February 11–15

No classes February 18–22

Week 5: February 25–March 1
Week 6: March 4–8
Week 7: March 11–15
Week 8: March 18–22
Week 9: March 25–29
Week 10: April 1–5
Week 11: April 8–12
Week 12: April 15–19

June Workshops begin Monday, June 3, 2019

FALL 2019

  • Registration must be received by August 19. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Fall classes begin Monday, September 9, 2019.

Week 1: September 9–13
Week 2: September 16–20
Week 3: September 23–27
Week 4: September 30–Oct. 4

No classes Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1
Classes meet Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Oct. 2, 3 and 4

Week 5: October 7–11

No classes Wednesday, Oct 9

Week 6: October 14–18
Week 7: October 21–25
Week 8: October 28–November 1
Week 9: November 4–8
Week 10: November 11–15
Week 11: November 18–22
Week 12: November 25–November 29

Classes meet Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 25 and 26
No classes Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 27, 28 and 29
Monday and Tuesday classes meet Dec. 2 and 3
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday classes meet Dec. 4, 5 and 6
Wednesday classes meet Dec. 11

SPRING 2020

  • Registration must be received by January 13. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Spring classes begin Monday, January 20, 2020.

Week 1: January 20–24
Week 2: January 27–31
Week 3: February 3–7
Week 4: February 10–14

No classes February 17–21

Week 5: February 24–28
Week 6: March 2–6
Week 7: March 9–13
Week 8: March 16–20
Week 9: March 23–27
Week 10: March 30–April 3
Week 11: April 6–10

Classes meet Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, April 6, 7 and 8
No classes Thursday and Friday, April 9 and 10

Week 12: April 13–17

Thursday and Friday classes meet April 23 and 24

June Workshops begin Monday, June 1, 2020

FALL 2020

  • Registration must be received by August 17. Registration received after this date is subject to a late fee of $25.
  • Fall classes begin Monday, September 14, 2020.

Week 1: September 14–18
Week 2: September 21–25
Week 3: September 28–October 2

No classes Monday, Sept. 28
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday classes meet Sept. 29, 30, Oct. 1 and 2

Week 4: October 5–9
Week 5: October 12–16
Week 6: October 19–23
Week 7: October 26–30
Week 8: November 2–6
Week 9: November 9–13
Week 10: November 16–19
Week 11: November 23–27

Classes meet Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 23 and 24
No classes Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Nov. 25, 26 and 27

Week 12: November 30–December 4

Monday classes meet Dec. 7
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday classes meet Dec. 9, 10 and 11

CHD Program in Modern Psychoanalysis

Individual Psychoanalysis Program Description

The Center for Human Development offers a curriculum leading to certification in individual psychoanalysis. This program meets both ABAP standards for certification and the New York State academic and clinical requirements for licensure in psychoanalysis.

The academic component of CHD’s program comprises seven areas of study: I) Maturation: Developmental Theory; II) History of Psychoanalysis; III) Psychoanalytic Theory; IV) Clinical Studies; V) Practice and Supervision; VI) Research; and VII) Electives. Students are required to take 32 courses—in addition to meeting the clinical requirements described in the section entitled “Graduation Requirements for Certification in Psychoanalysis.” These requirements meet New York State standards for licensure in psychoanalysis.

Completing the Program

Students can complete the program within four years. Each course (with the exception of C105) meets for 12 one hour-and-a half sessions. Upon completion of program requirements—32 courses; training analysis hours; supervisory hours; and the Final Paper and Presentation—students will receive a Certificate in Psychoanalysis and will be able to sit for the NYS licensing exam in Psychoanalysis to get their LP credential (licensed psychoanalyst).

**To sit for the licensing exam in NYS for the L.P. credential, students need to refer to the following website to obtain information about the required 1500 hours of supervised experience in the practice of psychoanalysis. http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mhp/psyanllic.htn

The practice of psychoanalysis is defined as:

  • the observation, description, evaluation, and interpretation of dynamic unconscious mental processes that contribute to the formation of personality and behavior in order to identify and resolve unconscious psychic problems which affect interpersonal relationships and emotional development, to facilitate changes in personality and behavior through the use of verbal and nonverbal cognitive and emotional communication, and to develop adaptive functioning; and
  • the use of assessment instruments and mental health counseling and psychotherapy to identify, evaluate and treat dysfunctions and disorders for purposes of providing appropriate psychoanalytic services.

Not less than 750 clock hours of such required experience must consist of direct contact with clients. The remaining experience may consist of other activities that do not involve direct client contact, including but not limited to, supervision, personal analysis and professional development.

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The Curriculum

AREA I. MATURATION: DEVELOPMENTAL THEORY (6 courses required)

M101 Infancy: Conception through Second Year of Life
M102 Oedipal Stage: Third through Sixth Year of Life
M103 Latency through Puberty
M104 Adolescence
M105 Young Adulthood
M106 Middle and Senior Years

AREA II. HISTORY OF PSYCHOANALYSIS (4 courses required)

H101 History of Psychoanalysis from 1895-1920
H103 History of Psychoanalysis from 1920-1940
H104 History of Psychoanalysis from 1940-1965
H105 Contemporary Theories, from 1965 to the Present

AREA III. PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY (7 courses required)

T103 The Preoedipal Personality: Narcissism and Aggression
T104 Transference and Resistance
T105 Countertransference and Countertransference Resistance
T106 Dream Interpretation: Classical and Modern Psychoanalytic Views
T107 Theory of Technique
T108 The Role of Unconscious Fantasy in Symptom Formation and Behavior
T109 Theory of Psychodiagnosis

AREA IV. CLINICAL STUDIES (8 courses required)

C101 Psychopathology: The Severe Disorders
C102 Psychopathology: Character Disorders and Neuroses
C103 Modern Psychoanalytic Intervention Strategy
C104 Clinical Studies in Gender and Sexuality
C105 Recognition and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Maltreatment (two-hour course)
C106 Core Concepts in Modern Psychoanalytic Group Technique
C107 Marriage and Family Therapy
C108 Professional Ethics and Psychoanalytic Research Methodology
C109 Sociocultural Issues in Psychoanalysis

AREA V. PRACTICE AND SUPERVISION (4 courses required)

P201 Case Seminars on Clinical Practice I (required for Treatment Service students)
P202 Case Seminars on Clinical Practice II (required for Treatment Service students)
TSS201 Case Supervision (required for Treatment Service students)
TSS202 Case Supervision (required for Treatment Service students)

AREA VI. RESEARCH (2 courses required)

R101 Introduction to Psychoanalytic Research/ Research Proposal Writing
R102 Data Collection, Findings, and Discussion

AREA VII. ELECTIVES

E101 Working with Trauma, Bereavement Overload, and Ambiguous Loss
E102 The Need to Have Enemies: A Psychoanalytic Study of Aggression in Dyads and Groups
E103 The Psychodynamics of Sexual Acting-out Behavior
E104 Building and Maintaining a Private Practice
E105 Advanced Research Practicum
E106 The Somatizing Patient
E107 Contributions of Female Psychoanalysts
E108 Psychoanalytic Understanding of Addictions
E109 Psychoanalytic Views of Women
E110 Psychoanalytic Views of Men
E111 Intensive Case Seminar in Family Treatment
E112 Psychoanalytic Writing
E113 Child and Adolescent Treatment
E114 Intensive Case Seminar in the Treatment of Couples
E115 Symbolic Communication, Dreams, and Fantasy
E116 The Psychodynamics of Racism and Discrimination
E117 Ethical Dilemmas in Psychoanalytic Practice
E118 The Care and Feeding of the Psychoanalyst
E119 Treating Couples
E120 Understanding Structural Theory: Madness in Literature and Film
E121 Trauma: Clinical Issues
E122 Understanding the Repetition Compulsion
E123 Continuing Case Seminar I
E124 Continuing Case Seminar II
E125 Introduction to Relational Psychoanalysis
E126 Introduction to British Object Relations
E127 Introduction to Bion’s Metatheory
E128 Reading Freud: Back to basics
E129 Freud-Neuroscience-Brain/Mind
New electives are added as needed.

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Course Descriptions

AREA I. MATURATION

This area of study (6 courses) focuses on the maturational tasks and fixations during human development—from conception and childhood, to adolescence and young adulthood, to middle age and the senior years.

M101. Infancy: Conception through Second Year of Life

Using readings and case presentations, students examine normal and pathological development during this earliest period of life; consider constitutional and environmental factors that affect maturation; and explore how the oral and anal phases shape character development. As they trace patterns of infantile experience, students are able to understand instinctual life and recognize fixations evident in the narcissistic disorders.

M102. Oedipal Stage: Third through Sixth Year of Life

This course examines the developmental tasks of the three- to six-year-old, particularly the intrapsychic separation from the mother, the development of early character structures, the path of the Oedipus Complex and its forms of resolution and fixation; the establishment of the superego; and gender distinctions during this period.

M103. Latency through Puberty

In the latency period, children’s developmental tasks include widening the sphere of activity to include school, re-experiencing separation issues, establishing peer groups, broadening interests and activities, mastering learning tasks, and sublimating sexual drives. Students read diverse psychoanalytic perspectives of this age period, including those of Sarnoff, A. Freud, S. Freud, Fraiberg, Spotnitz, Clevans, and recent researchers.

M104. Adolescence

Students gain an understanding of the primary intrapsychic challenges and achievements of puberty and adolescence. In particular, they learn how emotional needs and conflicts unfold during this developmental period, how psychic structures develop, and how maturational tasks differ for males and females.

M105. Young Adulthood

Students consider the maturational tasks of young adulthood and the blocks that interfere with their achievement. Between ages 20 to 40, challenges include identity definition; understanding sexual roles and differences; choosing careers and relationships; deciding whether to become a parent; redefining one’s relationship to family and society; and working toward success in work, love, and play. The class focuses on identifying conflicts reactivated from earlier developmental phases as young adults move through these important life passages.

M106. Middle and Senior Years

This class traces both normal and pathological adaptations during the developmental phases of middle and late adulthood. In middle adulthood—ages 40 to 70—challenges usually include the midlife crisis; maintaining positive relationships with significant others; dealing with an “empty nest;” finding continuing satisfaction in one’s chosen work and/or changing careers; achieving success in work, love, and play; and perceiving one’s limitations. In later adulthood, age 70+, issues of aging, retirement, illness, loss, and the development of new life goals dominate.

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AREA II. HISTORY OF PSYCHOANALYSIS

This component of the curriculum (4 courses) acquaints students with the historical development of psychoanalysis, from Breuer and Freud’s discoveries through the latest advances in the field.

H101. History of Psychoanalysis from 1895-1920

This class provides an intensive examination of the early development of psychoanalysis, beginning with Breuer and Freud’s (1895) theoretical/clinical discoveries about the origins and treatment of hysteria and anxiety, and the establishment of the method of psychoanalytic inquiry. It explores Freud’s hypotheses about the function of sexuality in normal and pathological development; the psychological meaning of symptoms; the mechanisms of dream formation and interpretation; and the shift from the topographical to the structural model of the mind.

H103. History of Psychoanalysis from 1920-1940

This course emphasizes Freud’s later work: the development of drive theory; refinements in the structural theory of mind; examination of instincts; investigation of inhibitions, symptoms, anxiety, and narcissism; conceptualization of the repetition compulsion; establishment of the principles of constancy, sublimation, and defense; and articulation of many forms of resistance and their resolution.

H104. History of Psychoanalysis from 1940-1965

This course traces the development of major psychoanalytic schools of thought—Ego Psychology, Object Relations, Self Psychology, among others—and their contributions to theory and technique.

H105. Contemporary Theories, 1965 to the Present

This course examines current theories (Modern Analytic, Intersubjective, Relational, etc.) of analyst-behavior, induced feelings, unconscious fantasy, the love-hate conflict, and the transference-countertransference matrix.

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AREA III. PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY

This area of study, consisting of 7 courses, educates students about the basic concepts of classical and modern psychoanalysis; provides an in-depth study of transference, resistance, countertransference, and countertransference resistance; offers a detailed understanding of the preoedipal patient; considers the modern psychoanalytic theory of technique; and focuses on theoretical/clinical aspects of dream interpretation and unconscious fantasy.

T103. The Preoedipal Personality: Narcissism and Aggression

This course studies the pivotal role of narcissism and aggression in the development of the preoedipal personality. Students focus particularly on the work of Spotnitz, Margolis, and Meadow, among others, in this area.

T104. Transference and Resistance

This course provides an understanding of the theories of transference and resistance as they were originated in classical psychoanalysis and expanded in modern psychoanalysis. Students gain this knowledge intellectually and experientially through its demonstration and practice in the classroom.

T105. Countertransference and Countertransference Resistance

This course traces the development of the concepts of countertransference and countertransference resistance. Using case material, it teaches students how to differentiate between subjective and objective countertransference reactions and identify the variety of countertransference resistances that may emerge during treatment of preoedipal patients. Students learn how to use their countertransference responses to understand patient dynamics.

T106. Dream Interpretation: Classical and Modern Psychoanalytic Views

This course affords students a historical perspective of the classical theory of dream work in the analytic process; demonstrates its evolution into the modern analytic mode; and provides a laboratory for experimental work on dreams in a safe setting. Learning objectives include facilitating insights, providing an arena for using dreams as a diagnostic tool, and offering the opportunity for utilizing dream work as a basis for therapeutic intervention in a supervised classroom.

T107. Theory of Technique

This course offers an examination of the theory underlying the techniques employed by modern analysts. In-depth study of Spotnitz’s formulations, and those of other modern analysts, provides the material of this class.

T108. The Role of Unconscious Fantasy in Symptom Formation and Behavior

Candidates consider the role of unconscious fantasy in the formation of symptoms, behaviors, and thoughts. Through case presentations, review of the literature, and class discussion, students learn to recognize how unconscious fantasy shapes what patients think, feel, and communicate.

T109. Theory of Psychodiagnosis

This class provides an understanding of the function of psychodiagnosis, which assesses physiological, developmental, historical, and defensive (primitive and higher order) processes. Students become familiar with the empirical descriptions of psychopathology classified in the both the PDM and the DSM. Knowledge of character pathology is utilized in the formulation of diagnoses.

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AREA IV. CLINICAL STUDIES

This area of study (8 courses) trains students in the application of theory and technique to the treatment of severe mental illness and character disorders; examines intervention strategy; explores issues of gender, sexuality, and sexual abuse and maltreatment. It also includes courses on working with groups and families, ethics in clinical and research settings, and sociocultural considerations in practice.

C101. Psychopathology: The Severe Disorders

Through case illustrations, essential readings and films, students consider the symptoms, conflicts, and defenses of schizophrenic and borderline patients. Students compare and contrast the psychiatric, classic psychoanalytic, and modern psychoanalytic models. The class pursues an in-depth understanding of transference and countertransference manifestations during treatment of schizophrenic and borderline patients, and the inevitable challenges that occur during their treatment.

C102. Psychopathology: Character Disorders and Neuroses

This course investigates the drives, affects, defenses, and clinical presentation of patients with character disorders: psychopathic (antisocial), schizoid, paranoid, depressive, manic, masochistic (self-defeating), obsessive and compulsive, hysterical (histrionic), and dissociative personalities. Students understand both the modern psychoanalytic conception of these illnesses and strategies for their treatment; identify the countertransference reactions these disorders evoke; and discuss cases with the class. Comparing and contrasting character-disordered patients with neurotic patients and discussing differences in treatment approaches, students gain an understanding of character formation and organization.

C103. Modern Psychoanalytic Intervention Strategy

This course explores the Modern Psychoanalytic contribution to intervention strategy in the treatment of preoedipal patients. Students learn a range of interventions used to foster the narcissistic transference, resolve resistance, and promote treatment success. In particular, students examine how modern analysts intervene in the beginning of treatment; how they address treatment-destructive and other resistances according to Spotnitz’s suggested protocol; and generally how resistances are understood, managed, and resolved.

C104. Clinical Studies in Gender and Sexuality

Students attain a theoretical understanding of the development of gender identification and the subsequent variations in sexual orientation and practice. Through readings and case presentations, students learn to identify blocks to sexual maturity and satisfaction; understand the etiology of deviations from the usual course of development; and consider how issues of gender and sexuality influence personality organization.

C105. Recognition and Reporting of Child Abuse and Maltreatment (2 hr. seminar)

This course meets the New York State licensure requirement by helping students to become familiar with the indicators of child abuse, maltreatment, and neglect. This knowledge can be applied to all practice settings in which professionals interact with children and their families or caregivers. The following topics are covered: legal definitions; key assessment factors; assessment of physical symptoms; assessment of behavioral symptoms; maltreatment and neglect; sexual abuse; hospitalization and the abused child; who is mandated to report; handling disclosures of abuse; reporting child abuse, maltreatment, or neglect; reporting procedures; other mandated or authorized actions; protective custody; when a report is made; and legal protection for mandated reporters.

C106. Core Concepts in Modern Psychoanalytic Group Technique

After tracing the development of group therapy, this course introduces students to the theory of modern psychoanalytic group work. Through an examination of the contributions of Spotnitz, Rosenthal, Ormont, and Meadow, among others, students consider basic concepts of group psychoanalysis: transference, resistance (both individual and group), countertransference, contracting, bridging, symbolic and emotional communication.

C107. Marriage and Family Therapy

This class studies how modern analysts conduct marriage and family treatment; examines the developmental tasks that must be completed in order for a person to be part of a successful marriage and family; identifies the major resistances of patients in marriage and family treatment; and shows how the marriage and family is viewed as a group.

C108. Professional Ethics and Psychoanalytic Research Methodology

In An Outline of Psychoanalysis, Freud (1940) described the implicit moral agreement in clinical practice. The course examines this moral pact by discussing important ethical issues concerning the treatment of patients and research methodology. It looks at the codes of ethics of NAAP, SMP, and the American Psychoanalytic Association and relates them to clinical examples. Readings focus on ethical issues concerning clinical goals; setting up private practices; the treatment frame; the implications of treatment techniques and/or modalities; and psychoanalysts’ responsibilities to their patients, the profession, colleagues, and institutional affiliations. Specific issues include sexual boundary violations (e.g. attraction and sexual intimacies); non-sexual boundary violations; self-disclosure; and the protection of confidentiality in psychoanalytic research methodology. Additional ethical issues involving competence and credentials; the analyst’s life and character (e.g., psychological stresses, burnout, physical illness) as they affect treatment; privacy, record keeping and access to records; multiple role relationships; fees, money management and managed care organizations; relationships with supervisees and colleagues; ethical dilemmas in specific settings (school systems, community agencies and businesses); psychoanalysts and the legal system; and psychoanalysts as training institute instructors. Students become familiar with scholarly publishing and research issues, such as competency to conduct research; obtaining consent; privacy and confidentiality; assessment of the design, procedures, and experiences to which patients will be subjected; and concern for research participants’ welfare.

C109. Sociocultural Issues in Psychoanalysis

This class trains clinicians for work with clients of varying racial, ethnic, cultural, and economic backgrounds. It educates students about the influence of sociocultural factors on both growth and pathology. It concentrates on important sociocultural concepts; diversity of childhood and family; social meanings of gender; sex and sexual orientation; and the impact of class on self-identity. Throughout the course, students broaden and deepen their knowledge and awareness of cultures and ethnicities other than their own and learn concepts that are central to the challenges of cross-cultural issues. Clinical examples are used to illustrate these concepts. The class considers which dimensions of human behavior are culturally based and which pathologically based. Important cultural issues, such as racism; whiteness and privilege; the impact of oppression on a patient’s emotional world; the legacy of immigration; how language shapes the personal, social, and emotional experience; transference; countertransference; cultural countertransference; and culturally defined aspects of mental health and pathology. Students continue to broaden and deepen their knowledge of cultural differences and explore clinical concepts that are central to cross-cultural work. Deeper exploration of sociocultural influences on growth and psychopathology is stressed.

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AREA V. PRACTICE AND SUPERVISION

This area of study (comprising 4 courses) provides an exploration of practice issues and supervision of students’ cases at the Treatment Service level, supplemented with readings appropriate to the cases presented. (Please consult the section entitled “Supervision Requirements” for information about clinical supervision.)

P201 and P202. Case Seminars on Clinical Practice I and II

These two courses address the practical and clinical issues relevant to the Treatment Service experience. They include, among other issues, the requirements of the Treatment Service setting; understanding patients’ dynamics as shown in their transference, symbolic communications, verbalizations, behaviors, and dreams; comprehending and resolving patients’ resistances; managing subjective and objective countertransference; resolving countertransference resistance; and employing supervisory counsel. Students trace the onset and course of symptoms and consider prognosis.

TSS201 and TSS202. Case Supervision (required for Treatment Service students)

In these two classes, students receive supervision of their individual patients at the Treatment Service, with a focus on understanding patient dynamics—both transference and resistance—and the analyst’s countertransference issues. In addition, the group formulates a diagnostic picture of the presented cases, discusses intervention strategies, and seeks to resolve treatment impasses. Note: After two years of TSS201 and TSS202, students may substitute E123 and/or E124 (Continuing Case Seminars on Clinical Practice I and II) for these courses.

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AREA VI. RESEARCH

This area of study (2 courses) introduces students to psychoanalytic research methods and new discoveries in neuropsychological research that enhance our understanding of unconscious dynamics. It also teaches the skills necessary for writing CHD’s Final Research Paper.

R101. Introduction to Psychoanalytic Research/ Research Proposal Writing

Students receive a background in the theoretical and practical knowledge of research, as they review the application of scientific research methods to human problems and address issues of the philosophy of science. In addition, recent discoveries in neuropsychology broaden identification of unconscious mechanisms. Students learn how to conduct research using a single-subject design; develop a proposal for the CHD Final paper; and use the writing process to probe case dynamics. They prepare a case narrative, find a research question, construct a review of relevant literature, and formulate an appropriate methodology for their papers.

R102. Data Collection, Findings and Discussion

This course prepares students to write the Data, Findings, and Discussion chapters of their Final Papers. Students learn how to gather data from sessions; analyze and draw inferences from the data; develop findings and set them into the context of literature and theory; consider the implications of supervisory and countertransference issues; and suggest questions for future research.

AREA VII. ELECTIVES

E101. Working with Trauma, Bereavement Overload, and Ambiguous Loss

How do clinicians work with trauma when they themselves are traumatized, and in the course of their daily work consistently being re-traumatized? This class examines the intense feelings sustained in the therapeutic dyad when an event or series of events has traumatized both patient and therapist. In particular, the class discusses the effects of global terrorism and mass annihilation. Case illustrations and didactic material are used to investigate crucial theoretical and clinical issues.

E102. The Need to Have Enemies: A Psychoanalytic Study of Aggression in Dyads and Groups

As the destructive side of human nature finds increasingly ingenious ways to assert itself, we may ask: Do human beings need enemies? Modern analysts study aggression, the forces of love and hate, and the developmental and intrapsychic dynamics that fuel violence in dyads and groups. This course examines the psychodynamics of aggression, enmity, and the roots of violence—beginning in infancy and crystallizing in young adulthood. Interventions to resolve resistances to experiencing and redirecting violent impulses in the analytic dyad, group, family, school and global community are considered.

E103 The Psychodynamics of Sexual Acting-out Behavior

Using theory and case examples to investigate the meaning of sexual acting out, students learn to read patient-behaviors for their diagnostic significance. This approach helps them to determine patients’ conflicting drives, their earliest object impressions, and the formation of sexual symptomatology.

E104. Building and Maintaining a Private Practice

Candidates address the issues of getting and keeping patients, including networking, outreach efforts, setting and collecting fees, and resolving patients’ treatment-destructive resistances to ongoing treatment.

E105. Advanced Research Practicum

This class, which functions as a writing workshop, is appropriate for students writing their CHD Final Papers who would like the regularity of meetings and a group context in which to share their work.

E106. The Somatizing Patient

This class offers a theoretical understanding of somatic reactions to psychic conflict. Through clinical presentations, students identify the defensive components of somatic symptoms, as well as the motive of secondary gain.

E107. Contributions of Female Psychoanalysts

This class reviews the theoretical and clinical contributions of female psychoanalysts to the development of psychoanalysis. Among others, authors studied include Klein, A. Freud, Mahler, Jacobson, Freeman Sharpe, Deutsch, and McDougall.

E108. Psychoanalytic Understanding of Addictions

This course addresses the typical underlying conflicts of addictive personalities and discusses the modern analytic approach to their treatment, including the adjunctive use of Twelve-Step, Harm-Reduction, and other rehabilitation approaches.

E109. Psychoanalytic Views of Women

This course traces the recent trends in psychoanalytic thinking regarding societal influences—particularly the changing role of women—and their impact on female development and psychic conflict.

E110. Psychoanalytic Views of Men

This course examines whether the field has viewed correctly men’s psychological development. The work of Munder Ross and Valliant is central to this study.

E111. Intensive Case Seminar in Family Treatment

Through case presentation and literature review, students learn various approaches to family treatment, including Systems Theory, the Narrative method, and the Modern Psychoanalytic model.

E112. Psychoanalytic Writing

This class provides a forum wherein participants share their writings—articles, lectures, monographs, books—and prepare them for publication.

E113. Child and Adolescent Treatment

Through readings and case presentation, this class explores the special demands of analytic work with acting-out, withdrawn, anxious, and disturbed children and adolescents.

E114. Intensive Case Seminar in the Treatment of Couples

Participants are encouraged to present cases in order to examine the dynamics of couples in psychoanalytic treatment—the partners’ transferences to each other and the analyst; their typical resistances; and the countertransference and countertransference resistances they arouse.

E115. Symbolic Communication, Dreams, and Fantasy

In this course, students investigate the use in treatment of symbolic communication, dreams, and fantasies as a way to facilitate patients’ progress. Participants learn to consider dreams and fantasies as material about the patient’s unconscious conflicts, symptoms, behaviors, and talk, as well as his/her transference.

E116. The Psychodynamics of Racism and Discrimination

Some have called racism the most important psychosocial problem in the United States. Students explore the psychic determinants of racism and discrimination through case examples and clinical literature, in an effort to determine the perpetrators’ motivation and the effect on victims.

E117. Ethical Dilemmas in Psychoanalytic Practice

This course addresses ethical issues such as record-keeping, confidentiality, boundaries, duty to warn, and other related practice standards, as laid down by national and state accrediting bodies. Additionally, it considers issues of child abuse and domestic violence.

E118. The Care and Feeding of the Analyst

This course explores those needs and comforts that permit analysts to practice optimally. It examines resistances to being nurtured properly, whether physically or emotionally, and focuses on methods of coping with and overcoming burnout and professional boredom. Using modern analytic techniques, shared experiences, and role-playing, such blocks to better living are identified and (hopefully) resolved.

E119. Treating Couples

This class studies how analysts conduct the treatment of couples; examines the developmental tasks that must be completed in order for an individual to be part of a successful couple; identifies the resistances of patients in couples treatment; and shows how the clinician works with countertransference in this modality.

E120. Understanding Structural Theory: Madness in Literature and Film

Through discussion of selected literature and film, participants analyze the characters’ pathology from an expanded structural viewpoint. Observing how characters function in situations of conflict over instinctual wishes, we can discern their traits, defenses, habits, moral standards, attitudes, interests, memories, and ideals.

E121. Trauma: Clinical Issues

In this course, students explore the therapist’s awareness of indicators of post-traumatic stress and examine theoretical overviews and treatment perspectives. Case examples of patients displaying a range of traumatic sequelae are presented in order to identify elements of psychic and physical trauma, the aftermath of trauma (PTSD), and various treatment approaches.

E122. Understanding of the Repetition Compulsion

In Beyond the Pleasure Principle, Freud associated destiny with the repetition compulsion; he thought that each of us is unconsciously programmed to repeat our fate. We unconsciously repeat distressing and painful situations throughout our life without recognizing our own participation in causing such incidents. He postulated that this was an attempt to master the experience of trauma but also noted that the persistent need for self-defeating behavior was evidence of the working of the death drive in human life.

E123, E124. Continuing Case Seminars on Clinical Practice I and II

These two classes concentrate on psychoanalytic cases presented by students. Session protocols (appropriately disguised) are examined in order to study these cases over time. Students consider the unfolding of cases and the specific issues arising in each treatment. Emphasis is placed on deep understanding of the primitive defenses and core conflicts of each patient, as well as the countertransference and countertransference resistances of the clinician. Note: After two years of TSS201 and TSS202, students may substitute E123 and/or E124 (Continuing Case Seminars on Clinical Practice I and II).

E125. Introduction to Relational Psychoanalysis

This class introduces analytic candidates to the new I broad-based approach termed “Relational”. Not a single coherent theory, this is a collection of interrelated perspectives on psychic development and psychoanalytic process as a fundamentally and intrinsically a two person process. We shall look at its roots in Object Relations theory, then track its growth through models of intersubjectivity, parent-infant studies, attachment theory, feminism, and clinical observations. Relational psychoanalysis has become the umbrella term for many analytic approaches today; in this class we hope the student, through lively conversation and clinical reference, will gain some fluency in its ideas and practice.

E126. Introduction to British Object Relations

This twelve-week course is designed to follow the evolution of British Object Relations theory through the study of its seminal theorists. Each class will include a brief lecture, case examples and discussion. A weekly single page paper is required, plus reading the articles and participating in the class discussions.

E127. Introduction to Bion’s Metatheory

In this course you will be introduced to the metatheory of Bion. Terms such as alpha and beta elements, alpha function, container-contained, attacks on linking, and projective identification will be discussed. Original writings of Bion will be read as well as related materials from authors such as Grotstein and Ferro. Application of Bion’s concepts to the clinical situation with patients will be addressed and participants will be encouraged to bring in case materials illustrating their understanding of these concepts.

E128. Reading Freud: Back to Basics

This class is constructed for beginners in psychoanalysis and also for the advanced who desire a review to reframe their basic understanding of Freudian theory. Freud is the backdrop of every analytic orientation and wherever you are in your psychoanalytic journey, Freud is where it all began. Reading the complete works of Freud can be an ambitious and time consuming endeavor that can be a frustrating goal because of time and energy issues. This class is designed for the soul who is hungry to achieve the whole frame of Freud – the founder of psychoanalysis.

E129. Freud — Neuroscience — Brain/Mind

How useful are our memories from earlier periods of life? Sometimes the experience or state of intense feelings and tension may be communicating or displacing in the present, something of the past. Freud introduced the concept of ‘screen memories’ in 1899, explaining that content into memory of itself. These memories do not come into consciousness with recall. Accuracy is not their prime concern. Screen memories employ ‘primary process’ and transform memory into images. This course will study the concept of screen memories utilizing its importance in its role in psychotherapy.

E130. Screen Memories & Its Usefulness in the Practice of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapies

How useful are our memories from earlier periods of life? Sometimes the experience or state of intense feelings and tension may be communicating or displacing in the present, something of the past. Freud introduced the concept of ‘screen memories’ in 1899, explaining that content into memory of itself. These memories do not come into consciousness with recall. Accuracy is not their prime concern. Screen memories employ ‘primary process’ and transform memory into images. This course will study the concept of screen memories utilizing its importance in its role in psychotherapy.

E131. Countertransference

This course will focus on an in-depth study of countertransference. Its theoretical development and application to clinical practice will be studied through assigned reading, discussion of case material, and class interaction. Students will examine subjective and objective countertransference reactions and identify the feelings that may emerge during treatment/p>

E132. Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Addiction & Treatment

Over the past 100 years the psychoanalytic community has conceptualized and treated addiction in a variety of ways. This course traces both the roots and evolution of psychoanalytic perspectives on addiction, discusses the development of treatment modalities, and elucidates the relationship between scientific findings and clinical treatment efforts.

E133. Freud’s Classic Cases

Focusing on Freud’s most famous cases—Anna O., Dora, Little Hans, the Rat Man, Dr. Shreber, and the Wolf Man—this course traces Freud’s growing of the mechanism of symptom formation; the dynamics of transference and resistance; and the ubiquity of countertransference reactions. This class highlights how astute clinical observation enabled Freud to develop major psychoanalytic hypotheses and an understanding of the conceptualization of hysteria, phobia, obsession, and paranoid schizophrenia; the techniques Freud developed to treat these cases and the transference-countertransference constellation manifesting in each case.

E134. Dissociation/Conflict Theory, Attachment and Psychosis

This class focuses on the term dissociation where we observe impulsiveness, instability in relationships, identity confusion, intense anger, feelings of emptiness, difficulty being alone, self-destructive behaviors. These factors may reflect a combination of vulnerabilities/weaknesses and especially traumatic early childhood experiences that culminated in a disorganized attachment style. In addition, aspects of psychosis will be reviewed to establish how it is related to dissociative processes and examine the difference. Case material will be presented to illustrate the range of behaviors, cognitions, symbolic expressions, etc.

E135. Dream Interpretation and Communication: Classical and Modern Psychoanalytic Views

This course will focus on the role and impact of dream analysis within the treatment process. A historical perspective will be explored as well as its relation to the modern analytic view which will afford students increasing insight and understanding into dream analysis. Participants explore the meanings and functions of dreams and are invited to bring in case examples of dreams as well as their own. We will focus on how to investigate these dreams as symbolic communications.

E136. The Neo-Kleinians of London

This class provides an intensive examination of the early development of psychoanalysis, beginning with Breuer and Freud’s (1895) theoretical/clinical discoveries about the origins and treatment of hysteria and anxiety, and the establishment of the method of psychoanalytic inquiry. It explores Freud’s hypotheses about the function of sexuality in normal and pathological development; the psychological meaning of symptoms; the mechanisms of dream formation and interpretation; and the shift from the topographical to the structural model of the mind.

E137. Using Journaling to Improve Your Mental, Physical and Emotional Health

Journaling includes expressive writing to deal with life experiences by making conscious knowledge of the trauma. This knowledge can be absent for the individual to know what really happened. This type of writing has been found to improve mental, physical and emotional health by focusing on memories. These memories can be filled with loss, pain of sensations containing fright and/or terror. Traumatic conditions contain sensory, mental and emotional intensity impacting us. Writing remains one method of expression in words to recall the events – the painful events to acknowledge what happened. Expressive writing can be used to treat a range of problems which affect our health.

E138. What Are Better Ways of Dealing With Complicated Situations or Difficult People?

Have you ever been so overwhelmed by what has been related to you that you didn’t know where, or how, to start? Have you ever been so antagonized by clients (or non clients), that you were unable to maintain the requisite emotional equilibrium that produces the most effective interventions? This course may suggest alternative approaches when you are confronted by either challenge.

E139. Working with Parents on Parenting

Looking back at theories of human development, this class will provide an overview of parenting as viewed through the psychoanalytic lens, from Freud to contemporary writers of parenting books. We will apply the theory to issues of child rearing today from potty training to safety with social media. This class will also study cultural differences in parenting.

E140. Comparative Psychotherapies

This course will focus on historical approaches to psychoanalytic inquiry from Freud to present. Class material will trace the arc of psychoanalytic thought from 1875 to present: Freud – Drive theory, structural theory; Hartmann – Ego psychology; Sullivan: Interpersonal; Klein, Fairbairn, Winnicott – Object relations and the British school; Bowlby – Attachment; Rogers – Humanistic; Lacan – Intersubjective and the French School; Spotnitz – Modern.

E141. The Use of Silence in Modern Psychoanalysis

This 90-minute workshop will explain the benefits and the difficulties of using silence in the early stages of analysis as a tool to begin building a therapeutic relationship. It will include guidelines to help analysts intervene where their patients are emotionally.

E142. Identifying, Understanding and Learning to Use Countertransferences With Your Clients

In our sessions with patients, we experience many different feelings about them; feelings which sometimes have nothing to do with them. We experience bodily sensations and sometimes “hear” a song or remember a movie or find ourselves drifting into a daydream. What could all this mean? How can we use these to help us better understand our clients and utilize what is going on inside of us to assist with what is going on in the room with them? In this workshop we will look at these countertransferences and discuss how they can be used to understand what is happening and to distinguish whether they have any meaning or not.

E143. Attachment Theory and I Devices

I Devices have become a daily part of modern life. This class explores the effects on ‘attachment behavior(s)’ when I Devices replace contact with parental and other adult relationships. The history of attachment theory will be reviewed and the influence of over-stimulating content/disturbing material in lieu of parent and other adult figures. Are I Devices becoming a replacement for adult human contact? There is contemporary research and case studies delineating some of the following symptoms: crying/screaming, sleep disturbances, clinging, increased heart rate, freezing or feelings of paralysis, losing control, etc. Cases of children’s behavior will be discussed. In addition, the writings of following developmental theorists will be reviewed: Freud, Jung, Piaget, Steiner, and others. The effects of trauma will be addressed and what may be contributing to enduring negative and emotional effects of violent/overstimulating/graphic media.

E144. Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Substance Use Disorders

This 90-minute workshop will trace the arc of psychoanalytic thinking on substance use disorders from Freud to present day.

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Graduation

To receive a Certificate in Psychoanalysis, students must:

  • complete 32 required courses (576 clock hours) complete the requirements for Treatment Service – at least two semesters of the required Treatment Service courses and accrue 750 patient contact hours on this level at CHD’s Treatment Service site or at an approved NYS and licensed agency with an agreement by CHD and the site and demonstrate a clear understanding of the dynamics of transference, unconscious communication and behavior, resistance, countertransference, and countertransference resistance;
  • complete a training analysis with a New York State licensed, NAAP-registered modern psychoanalyst on the CHD faculty, for a total of 350 sessions. Fifty of these hours may be accrued in group analysis with a New York State licensed, NAAP-registered modern analyst on the CHD faculty;
  • complete at least 150 hours of supervision with New York State licensed and NAAP registered psychoanalysts on the faculty of CHD — 50 hours of which must be in Control Analysis with a New York State licensed and NAAP-registered analytic supervisor on CHD’s faculty; and an additional 150 hours must be with a minimum of two (2) additional supervisors. No supervisor can be one’s analyst or one’s analyst a supervisor;
  • complete a CHD Final Paper on the Control Case, a project which demonstrates an ability to apply research principles to a case study and understand the motivational forces in the patient’s psychic structure; and
  • present a Control Case before the faculty which demonstrates an ability to identify, study, resolve resistances, and understand intrapsychic dynamics.
  • *To sit for the licensing exam in NYS for the L.P. credential, students need to refer to the following website to obtain information about the required 1500 hours of clinical experience:
    http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mhp/psyanllic.htm

(Students must remain in supervision with a CHD faculty member while accruing these 1500 hours until graduation)

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Fee Schedule for the Program in Psychoanalysis

All fees are paid directly to CHD

Application and Enrollment Fee $65
Matriculation Fee $65
Semester Registration Fee $50
Late Registration Fee per semester $25
Course Tuition $350
Fee for Maintaining Matriculation (per semester) $50
Graduation Fee $100
Student Transcript $10
Individual Training Analysis privately arranged
Group Training Analysis privately arranged
Individual Supervision privately arranged
Control Supervision privately arranged
Group Supervision privately arranged
Research Supervision privately arranged

Refund Schedule

Before the first class meeting 100% tuition refund
After first class meeting 50% tuition refund
After second class meeting 0% Refund

Tuition Payment Plan

Students may request a payment plan to cover tuition expenses by contacting the Office of Administration at the CHD address or telephone number. If so arranged, students may divide their tuition into two or three payments.

Student Transcripts

Students may request copies of their official transcripts by following these procedures: Send a letter to the Office of Administration which includes your signature and the names and addresses of recipients. Please enclose a check for $10 for each transcript requested.

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June Workshops

Each June, CHD provides workshops on topics of interest to the community at large, and to psychoanalysts, social workers, psychotherapists, psychologists, counselors, psychiatrists, mental health professionals, educators, physicians, scientists. members of the clergy, businessmen and women, artists, and pastoral counselors. Past workshops have centered on new discoveries in neuropsychology, stress, parenting, sibling relationships, creativity, trauma, sexuality, depression, emotional communication in treatment, building a private practice, and nonverbal and symbolic communication.

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CHD Program for Teaching Assistants

The institute offers a two-semester program that trains graduates of CHD, and other NAAP/SMP-registered modern psychoanalytic institutes, in the unique techniques of Modern Psychoanalytic teaching. Instructors with wide experience in institute and other educational settings serve as their mentors. Teaching Assistants must be eligible to sit for the New York State licensing examination in psychoanalysis

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Chairman of the Board

Allan Jay

Allan Jay has been involved in the financial industry since 1979. He has been a principle of a number of financial firms that involved brokerage, asset management, fund management and advisory services.

Faculty Biographies

John Augliera, MA, LP

201 West 89th Street, Suite 5FF,
New York, NY 10024
212-877-3351
Jaugliera89@gmail.com

Associate Director, Board Member, Faculty, Training Analyst, Supervisor, CHD; former Adjunct Instructor, Object Relations Institute and New York University; NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Registered Analyst, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis; Member, American Psychological Association, Div. 39.

Susan R. Blumenson, PhD, LP

24 Fifth Avenue, Ground Floor Suite
New York, NY 10011
212-473-5580, Fax: 212-614-0746
SusanRBlu@aol.com

Founding Member, Secretary of Board of Trustees, Dean of Curriculum, Faculty, Training Analyst, and Supervisor, CHD; Book Review Editor, Current Trends in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy; Former Faculty Liaison for Student Affairs, Alumni Association Coordinator, and Faculty, College of Psychoanalysis, Heed University; Former Adjunct Assistant Professor, John Jay College for Criminal Justice, CUNY; Former Adjunct Faculty, The Union Institute; Former Board of Trustees, Chair of the Curriculum Committee, Faculty, Training Analyst and Supervisor, Mid-Manhattan Institute; Former Faculty, Training Analyst, and Supervisor, ACAP (Psychoanalytic Center of New Jersey); Registered Psychoanalyst, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, Society of Modern Psychoanalysts. NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Vermont-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Former Chair of the Committee on Accreditation, American Board for Accreditation in Psychoanalysis; Fellow, American Orthopsychiatric Association.
Publications include: “The Mirror of Silence: A Method of Treating a Preverbal Schizophrenic Patient,” “Incoherent Speech and Nonverbal Behaviors to Verbal Expression: Progress Through Minute Changes,” and “An Addiction to Acquiescing: The Inability to Say No.”

Susan Jakubowicz, PhD, LP, LCSW, CPG

301 East 21 Street, Suite 1K
New York, NY 10010
212-473-1400, Fax: 212-260-7564
SusanJak@aol.com

Founding Executive Director, Board of Trustees, Faculty, Training Analyst, and Supervisor, CHD; Former Board of Trustees, American Board for Accreditation in Psychoanalysis; Founding Editor, Current Trends in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy; Director, College of Psychoanalysis, Heed University; Adjunct Associate Professor, New York University School of Social Work; Founding Member, Faculty, Training Analyst, Supervisor, Center for the Advancement of Group Studies; Former Board of Trustees, Dean of Training, Co-Chair of Program in Modern Group Psychoanalysis, Mid-Manhattan Institute; Past Vice President, Chair, Membership Committee, Society of Modern Psychoanalysts (SMP); Former Member, Membership Registration Committee, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP); Faculty, Training Analyst, Supervisor, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Study Center, Psychoanalytic Studies Program; Board-Certified Diplomate, Clinical Member, American Psychological Association; Clinical Member, American Group Psychotherapy Association; Certified Doctoral Addictions Counselor, National Board of Addiction Examiners; Certified Group Psychotherapist, National Registry of Certified Group Psychotherapists; NYS-Licensed Clinical Social Worker; Certified Cognitive Behavioral Therapist, International Academy of Behavioral Medicine; Diplomate Status, Chemical Dependency Counseling, Professional Counseling and Professional Psychotherapy; Registered Psychoanalyst and Group Psychoanalyst, NAAP, SMP; NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Vermont-Licensed Psychoanalyst.
Publications include: "The Use of Disturbing Countertransference Feelings in Working with AIDS Patients,” “Enriching the Experience of Teaching Through Understanding and Using Countertransference Feelings" (with T. Chuah), and "The Healing Journey: Preparation and Recovery from Surgery.

Calla C. Jo, LP, LCSW

31 East 12th Street #1E
New York, NY 10003
917-428-7347
callacjo@gmail.com

Faculty and graduate of CHD; Adjunct Lecturer and Graduate of New York University Silver School of Social Work; Clinical Social Worker at Arista Center for Psychotherapy; Graduate of Yale University; Member, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis; Former Associate to the Royal Academy of Dancing; Former Faculty of Merce Cunningham Studio.

Harlan J. Matusow, PhD, LP

928 Broadway, Suite 1206
New York, NY 10010
914-320-0350
hjmatusow@gmail.com

NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Faculty, CHD; Project Director/Principal Investigator National Development and Research Institutes; Member, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis.
Selected publications: The most critical unresolved issue associated with: psychoanalytic theories of addiction: can the talking cure tell us anything about substance use and misuse? Substance use & misuse 48 (3), 239-247; Factors Associated with Mental Health Clinicians' Referrals to 12-Step Groups, Journal of addictive diseases, 31 (3), 303-312; Consumers’ experiences in dual focus mutual aid for co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, Substance abuse: research and treatment, 7, 39.

Michaela Kane Schaeffer, PhD, LP

170 Rugby Road
Brooklyn, New York 11226
718-693-2243

Board of Trustees, Research Coordinator, Faculty, CHD; NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; Registered Psychoanalyst, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP), Society of Modern Psychoanalysts; Former Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Former Board of Directors, Faculty, Riverdale Seminars in Modern Psychoanalysis; Former Board of Directors, Planning Committee Member, Brooklyn Seminars in Modern Psychoanalysis; Former Member, NAAP; Former Membership and Registry Committee, American Counseling Association.

Jacqueline M. Swensen, PhD, LP, LCSW

119 West 57 Street, Suite 720
New York, NY 10019
212-230-1881
drj@drswensen.com

Dean of Clinical Training, Board Member, Faculty, Training Analyst, Supervisor, CHD; NYS-Licensed Psychoanalyst; NYS-Licensed Clinical Social Worker; Registered Psychoanalyst, Member, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis.
Unpublished Dissertation: “Intervening Where Your Patient Is: A Modern Psychoanalytic Guide for Establishing and Building the Narcissistic Transference.”

Adjunct Faculty

Richard Friedman, PhD, LCSW
Natalie Riccio, PhD, LP, LCSW
Additional adjunct faculty upon request

CHD’s Mascot

Rosenberg

The Center for Human Development is not only people friendly — we are pet friendly, too! Rosenberg is part of our family and even with his busy schedule, he makes time to be our Mascot. Some fun facts about Rosenberg: he’s an Aussiedoodle, is both an emotional-support dog and a model, has appeared in Dolce Vita ss15 campaign, has participated in social media campaigns including Pepsi and Scoop, travels on planes visiting other Aussiedoodle friends, and enjoys having his picture taken. You can follow Rosenberg’s adventures on Instagram: @RosenbergTheDog

All photos © 2016 Chantal Adair
www.chantaladair.com
adairchantal@gmail.com

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